iowa

Details Matter on Heath Hill's Farm in Iowa

Heath Hill farms 750 acres on the Southeast corner of Hamilton County in Iowa. We met up with him to hear how he and his AgVenture Yield Specialist are focusing on the details to increase yield across his operation. Watch the video to hear his story. 

 

Scenes from an Iowa farm

Jeff Morse is one of the AgVenture "Some Say It. We Do It." bloggers. He lives outside of Council Bluffs, Iowa, and runs a hoop barn cattle operation along his corn and soybean operation. Jeff is working with his two sons to grow the operation and bring them in as fifth generation farmers. One of Jeff's sons, Jared Morse, now works for AgVenture as a Profizone Tech Rep at AgVenture Western Cornbelt.

“Starting the Late Summer Pickup”

Around the Farm

We’ve just been doing work work, work, work lately. At this point, it’s just the late summer pickup, and we’re cleaning things up before fall starts. Of course we’re also taking care of the cows and getting the combine ready. We’re trying to sell about 40 head of cattle. Eat more beef, because we need the cattle market to go up.

AgVenture GroMor Expands Eastward, Hires AgVenture Yield Specialist Jason Hosek

KENTLAND, INDIANA (June 23, 2015) — AgVenture GroMor, an independently owned and operated regional seed company based in Ames, Iowa has extended its reach eastward. The growing company has hired Jason Hosek of Anamosa to serve east central Iowa customers as their AgVenture Yield Specialist.

Death on the Farm: Grieving in the Midst of Planting

We’ve been going through a rough time lately. Two weeks ago today, my father of 93 years passed away. He was my business partner, my mentor and a big part of my life, and I feel lucky to have had a dad like him for so long in my life. So many people don’t get to have their dad with them near as much as I had mine.

He worked with me on my farm up to the end, as long as he could. He was very proud of the fact that he had grandsons that farmed, and myself. I guess he was proud of me too.

Comeback Corn—Harvest is Beginning on Replant Crops

Today’s the day—we’re getting the combine ready to start cutting corn and beans. We just got our chopping done on about 50 acres of corn silage for our cattle, and we're ready to start harvesting the rest.

In my neighborhood, I'm probably a little bit behind some of these guys, but beans don't take very long to cut once you start going (if you don't have any trouble). You're taking such a wide swath, and there's just not near as much product compared to corn. There’s about a third less grain to haul to the bins, so our soybeans will be short, hopefully.

Devastating June Storms Cause Replanting in Iowa

The June 3rd storm was rather devastating for the crop. We got flat, golf-ball-sized hail, and it ended up being about 3 inches deep by the time it was done hailing. And then it proceeded to rain and storm. It pretty much wiped the whole crop out, so we ended up replanting. Luckily, not all of our fields got hit so hard, but we did have to replant on our two other farms as well.

Working with Loess Soil

Around here, we don't use any irrigation at all. We depend on Mother Nature for all of our moisture, and it works well for us. Our soil holds a lot of moisture — about 2 inches per foot of water. So it takes about 20 inches a year to grow a crop of corn, and corn roots will go down approximately 5 or 6 feet. If your soils aren't too compacted, they might even go 7, 8 or 9 feet. So if you looking at starting out with 2 inches a foot, then you're looking at only needing about 6 to 8 inches; and maybe and you're sitting all right. That’s a nice advantage to have.

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