Mississippi Harvest: Looking back at a successful season

This year, we did a really good job spacing out our acres so harvest would be easier to manage. We went real heavy corn this year — out of 4800 acres, we had 4000 acres of corn, 800 of beans, so I really didn’t want all that corn to be ready for harvest at once. We did a good job, so we could get all the corn harvested in a timely manner and didn’t have everything drying out in the field.

 At the time we were making the decision to do so much corn, bean prices were in the tank and corn had the most upside potential — or we felt like it did at the time. We second guessed ourselves watching the bean market this summer, but it is what it is.

 We had a lot of rain during planting, and we had neighbors that had tremendous amounts of flooding. I don’t know if you saw it on the news, but in Louisiana, they’d get 20-30 inches of rain at a time, and we’re right next to them. We didn’t get quite as much as they did, but we had a tremendously wet spring, and we stayed really cool a lot longer than we normally do, which pushed planting back. We were hitting 40-degree nights and it wasn’t conducive to corn seed.

 One of our fields in particular is ringed all the way round by two different bayous, and we had 160 feet of water all the way around on both sides of the bayou. We had to wait for the water to go down before we could plant, and sometimes we had to push and mud the seed in. When it kept getting later and later, we just had to plant — but that wasn’t much out of our whole 4800 acres, and it did end up looking okay.

 Over the summer in general, everything started to look fantastic. We feel like we kind of got it lit — fertilizer got out when it was supposed to, herbicide was on time, and we did some other proactive things. Everything was really timed out well and was done when it was supposed to be done.

 Wayne of course has been running around trying to field a thousand different phone calls and help us too. He’s still a huge part of this farm, and we’re slugging through it together.

Toward the end of the season, we were 10 days away from a massive drought, so we focused on irrigation. This year we didn’t see any disease or pest pressure or stress or anything. The weather was cooperative, and the corn loved it.